American Indian Studies (AIST)

AIST 101 Elementary Nez Perce I

4 credits
Cross-listed with NEZP 101
Pronunciation, vocabulary, reading, spoken Nez Perce, and functional grammar.

AIST 102 Elementary Nez Perce II

4 credits
Cross-listed with NEZP 102
Pronunciation, vocabulary, reading, spoken Nez Perce, and functional grammar.
Prereq: AIST 101

AIST 110 Community Building

3 credits
This course is aimed towards first generation college students from indigenous communities. This course helps students build community support through existing programs at the university and facilitates students’ connections with their tribal cultures. It also helps students develop good study habits and build study skills.

AIST 111 Intro to Success

1 credit
This course assists each student’s academic, cultural, and social adjustment to the University. The course is also designed to provide supportive tools and resources to each student to ensure they are maximizing their ability. The course will focus on a few of the topic areas: time management, organization skills, tribal issues and tribal governmental structures, importance of diversity, learning styles, budgeting, and test taking.

AIST 201 Intermediate Nez Perce I

4 credits
Pronunciation, vocabulary, reading, spoken Nez Perce, and functional grammar.
Prereq: AIST 102 or NEZP 102

AIST 204 (s) Special Topics

Credit arranged

AIST 210 Native Identities

3 credits
This course is intended to develop a dynamic modern understanding of indigenous communities and self. The class will focus on such themes as family, history, blood & kinship, colonization, treaty rights and sovereignty, land and linguistics.

AIST 298 Tribal Natural Resource Internship

1-4 credits
This course is a supervised internship in an Indian community setting that provides work experience and learning opportunities in natural resource ecology and management. The course requires the development of a formal plan of activities and learning goals that must be approved by the onsite supervisor and faculty instructor.

AIST 314 Tribal Sovereignty and Federal Policy

3 credits
Cross-listed with ANTH 314
The Tribal Sovereignty and Federal Policy course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of how colonial and Federal Indian Policies have impacted the lives of Tribes and their surrounding communities. Through a survey of the changing eras of policy (conquest, pre-Revolutionary approaches, the Marshall Trilogy, the Treaty Era, Allotment and Termination, and Self-Determination), students will learn about the forces that have shaped tribal communities, and a deeper appreciation for tribes’ efforts to restore and exercise their sovereignty. Tribal Sovereignty as it applies to land management, natural resources and community development will be a focal area.

AIST 316 American Indian History

3 credits
Cross-listed with HIST 316
Course investigates Indigenous people in North America from time immemorial to present. Emphasizes Native American resilience and adaptability in the face of colonialism.

AIST 320 Native American & Indigenous Film

3 credits
Gen Ed: American Diversity
Examines the representation of American Indians in film from early-mid 20th century Hollywood westerns to self representations of late 20th and early 21st century films made by Native Americans. Traces changes in the cinematic depictions of Native peoples and historical and cultural reasons for those changes. Emphasizes Native-made film as extension of oral tradition, indigenous aesthetics, and sovereignty. May include international Indigenous films.

AIST 321 (s) Tribal Elders Series

3 credits, max 9
Cross-listed with ANTH 321
This course is intended to share information from the neighboring tribes surrounding the University of Idaho. Elders from these communities will share a tribal epistemology that each tribe considers to be essential to an education of an adult. Such educational perspective may often be missing/misrepresented or misunderstood in current university pedagogy. This class will place an emphasis on contemporary indigenous voices. This course will have a subtopic heading to incorporate the possibility of having many neighboring tribes participate.

AIST 329 Contemporary North American Indians

3 credits
Cross-listed with ANTH 329
Histories, cultures, and practices of contemporary North American Indians.

AIST 344 Indigenous Ways of Knowing

3 credits
The course is intended as an introduction to issues of cultural, racial, ethnic and linguistic diversity that arise in American school and society. In particular we will be looking at indigenous epistemological comparison with Western educational models. The central question for the course will be: Why is educational attainment different for different groups in society, and how does that difference relate to social stratification characteristics of the larger society? We will also try to answer other questions: What is the impact of cultural and linguistic diversity on the various institutions of society, including family, schools, and the economic system? What policies and programs have been developed in the US and other societies to deal with cultural diversities? These and other questions will be the basis for our reading and discussions.

AIST 400 (s) Seminar

Credit arranged

AIST 403 (s) Workshop

Credit arranged

AIST 404 (s) Special Topics

Credit arranged

AIST 411 Native American Architecture

3 credits
Gen Ed: American Diversity
Cross-listed with ARCH 411
An exploration of Native American architecture in North America, including ancient, historic, and contemporary buildings and settlements within their diverse social, cultural, and physical contexts. Additional assignments required for graduate credit. (Spring only)

AIST 412 Tribal Governance

3 credits
This course is intended to impart an understanding of the vitality and rich diversity of contemporary American Indian societies, their histories, and their literatures, e.g., in the arts and expressive culture, governmental affairs both indigenous and external, economics, ecological relations and natural resources, health care, and family, social and religious life, oral traditions, world views and cultural values. This understanding is inclusive of both indigenous cultural and contact-historical expressions. An understanding of Tribal sovereignty and its varied meanings is key to this outcome.
Prereq: AIST 210

AIST 420 Native American Law

3 credits
Cross-listed with LAW 949
Study of Tribal Sovereignty and interaction with the U.S. government at various levels with an emphasis on treaty rights, jurisdictional issues, the trust relationship, protection of lands, the eras of U.S. Indian policy, and the continued assertion of tribal rights and interests. LAW 949 is a law class and will be graded based on the norms and expectations to which law students are normally held. AIST 420 is an undergraduate course that will be assessed on a P/F basis according to the general norms and expectations for an upper division undergraduate course.

AIST 422 Contemporary Pacific Northwest Indians

3 credits
Gen Ed: American Diversity
Cross-listed with ANTH 422 and RELS 422
This course is intended to impart an understanding of the vitality and rich diversity of contemporary Pacific Northwest American Indian societies, their histories, and their literatures, e.g., in the arts and expressive culture, in governmental affairs both indigenous and external, in economics, ecological relations and natural resources, in health care, and in family, social and religious life, in oral traditions, in world views and cultural values. This understanding is inclusive of both indigenous cultural, as well as contact-historical, expressions. An understanding of Tribal sovereignty and its varied meanings is key to this outcome. ANTH 422 is cooperative: open to WSU degree-seeking students.

AIST 478 Tribal Nation Economics and Law

3 credits
Cross-listed with LAW 928
Survey of economic development strategies by various Tribal Nations, including an overview of federal incentive programs and disincentives for the growth of strong tribal economies. Tribal legal codes, commercial projects, and federal Indian law parameters will be discussed. Topics will include: the tribal government-owned corporate model, gaming enterprises, economic diversification, the federal 8(a) program, limitations on tribal tax-exempt bond offerings, and value-added on-reservation products. LAW 928 is a law class and will be graded based on the norms and expectations to which law students are normally held. AIST 478 is an undergraduate course that will be assessed on a P/F basis according to the general norms and expectations for an upper division undergraduate course. (Spring, alt/years)

AIST 484 American Indian Literature

3 credits
Gen Ed: American Diversity
Cross-listed with ENGL 384
Major themes and traditions in American Indian texts.
Prereq: ENGL 102
Prereq or Coreq: One 200-level ENGL Survey

AIST 498 (s) Internship

Credit arranged
Supervised internship in an Indian community setting, integrating academic study with work experience; requires formal plan of activities to be approved by the on site supervisor and assigned faculty member; a final written report will be evaluated by the assigned faculty member.
Prereq: Permission

AIST 499 (s) Directed Study

Credit arranged